Reflection about my subjects

The Common Core asks students to read stories and literature, as well as more complex texts that provide facts and background knowledge in areas such as science and social studies. This stresses critical-thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills that are required for success in college, career, and life. Because students must learn to read, write, speak, listen, and use language effectively in a variety of content areas, the standards promote the literacy skills and concepts required for college and career readiness in multiple disciplines. States determine how to incorporate these standards into their existing standards for those subjects or adopt them as content area literacy standards.

Reflection about my subjects

Aug 9th, By Bryan Cross Category: Blog Posts If God is all powerful, and truly seeks our good, then why does He allow bad things to happen to people?

Why does God allow all the suffering we experience in this life, if He loves us and is all-powerful and all-knowing? What does the Catholic Church say about the meaning of suffering? Job and his Wife c. But God loves us infinitely more than we love each other.

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Therefore we know that God wants us to have what is good for us, what truly makes us happy. But that is just what makes the sufferings of this present life so odd, perplexing, even apparently contradictory.

If God is all powerful, and truly seeks our good, then why does He allow all the suffering we experience in Reflection about my subjects life? Recently a young man I know survived a plane crash. Upon hearing the news, some of us responded by thanking God that he survived.

Another person responded to our thanksgiving by objecting that if God existed, He would have prevented the plane crash. Obviously there cannot be a good God, argues the atheist, because if God existed, He would not allow such meaningless, pointless evil and suffering to occur.

Reflection about my subjects

The common hidden assumption is that if we cannot see for ourselves any justifying reason, then either there cannot be any such reason, or it is not reasonable to believe that there is such a reason.

In other words, the objection presupposes that a Being infinitely greater than ourselves either does not exist or has not revealed His goodness and love to us, and in that respect the objection assumes precisely what it is trying to show.

It follows from atheism that suffering, tragedy, and loss are ultimately meaningless and pointless, and hence to be avoided at all costs unless some outweighing good can be anticipated. And that is precisely why in the atheistic philosophy, if we find ourselves or others suffering without the foreseeable possibility of coming to a quality of life that outweighs this suffering, it is better to end that life, all other things being equal.

But that is not the Christian understanding of suffering. The Origin of Evil and Suffering As with most theological questions, we need to go back to the beginning.

God made all things such that they were in harmony, as the Catechism explains: The first man was not only created good, but was also established in friendship with his Creator and in harmony with himself and with the creation around him, in a state that would be surpassed only by the glory of the new creation in Christ.

As long as he remained in the divine intimacy, man would not have to suffer or die. By the original justice God gave to our first parents, they were able to remain in these ordered harmonies.

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The lower powers of their soul were held subject to their reason, without any disorder whatsoever. Even their bodies were entirely subject to their soul, without any bodily defect. In this state, man did not have to suffer or die. God did not design man to be in a condition of suffering or death.

Man sinned, and by doing so forfeited the four-fold harmony by which he was protected from suffering and death. It is still a good world — that is how we are able to recognize the resulting disharmony, against the background of the goodness and natural order of creation — but there is now disharmony in our world, a disharmony that God did not put here.

The teaching of the Catholic Church is quite different from that of the atheists with regard to the origin of suffering. For the materialist atheists, nature is ultimately impersonal, indifferent and apathetic; suffering just is.

We do not like suffering, but ultimately, suffering is neither evil or good, because ultimately there is no good or evil; there is just matter and energy and the fundamental laws of physics.

Reflection about my subjects

Some suffering is the result of the actions of other people, but much suffering is simply gratuitous, pointless, and outside the bounds of human control. For Christians, by contrast, the Creator of all things is a perfectly good, perfectly just, 14 and perfectly loving Father.

Suffering and death, and all the evils we experience in this life, have their origin in human sin against God our Father. The Purposes of Suffering While the atheist thinks his suffering is ultimately meaningless and pointless, the Christian believes that no suffering is ultimately meaningless or pointless.

Because we believe that a loving God is providentially orchestrating all things, in a way that upholds our freedom. For that reason we believe that when God allows us to suffer, He is doing so to protect us from a greater evil, or to lift us to a far greater and outweighing good.

God always has a good purpose in allowing suffering, even when that purpose is inscrutable to us. What purpose or purposes does God have in allowing suffering? To answer that question, we need to review, why, according to the Church, man is here.As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 75, lessons in math, English, science, history, and more.

Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed. common core state stanDarDs For english Language arts & Literacy in History/social studies, science, and technical subjects appendix B: text exemplars and.

How do ‘I write a good personal reflection?’ Many students are riding intellectual waves, devoting hours of mental and emotional energy to examination preparation so, today’s post is a practical one inspired by a question from my year 12 students.

Despite the differences between the two subjects they intersect since policies tend to Self-Reflection “Before my internship I knew I wanted to attend grad school, but I always said I want to work two years then Microsoft Word - Reflection Essay timberdesignmag.com Author: Campbell, Lauren C Created Date.

My President Was Black. A history of the first African American White House—and of what came next. This paper is a reflection of my life. It explores my life through five parts.

These five parts are: 1 - Family of origin and major childhood influences, 2 - important events, achievements, and persons, 3 - Faith history including call into ministry.

Personal Reflection In Research Study Skills English Language Essay. Print Reference this. Disclaimer: I sometimes, concentrate more on one subject and neglect the other ones. My sources are often limited because I do not expand my research and I never try to think of ways to search for them. Welcome to the website of writer & engineer Jon Thrower. The website includes improvisation exercises, and scenarios, creativity techniques and script downloads. Mission of Student Disability Services. Student Disability Services is committed to removing barriers for students with disabilities at The University of Toledo by ensuring that .

4 - Work history, 5 - Marriage and family history.

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